In Mexico, fears a new plant will kill wastewater farming
Business

In Mexico, fears a new plant will kill wastewater farming

Farmers are up in arms over a new treatment plant north of Mexico City that is meant to clean up raw sewage from the capital that has long fouled rivers and reservoirs in the rural Mezquital Valley _ tainted waters they have used as fertilizer for decades

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Business

Shea Moisture hair line company apologizes in ad dust up

The black-founded hair care company Shea Moisture apologized Monday amid social media criticism from black users over an online video promoting its products using white women

Border wall, health care jeopardize bill days from shutdown
Business

Border wall, health care jeopardize bill days from shutdown

Critical issues remain unresolved as Congress and the White House push toward a Friday deadline to fund the government or risk a shutdown

Senate confirms Sonny Perdue as agriculture secretary
Business

Senate confirms Sonny Perdue as agriculture secretary

The Senate has confirmed former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as agriculture secretary

Business

Aviation officer gives his version of United flight removal

The Chicago aviation police officer who pulled a man off a United Airlines flight describes the man as physically and verbally combative during the incident

Business

Unisys' adjusted earnings top estimates, stock surges

Shares in Unisys Corp. surged on Monday after its adjusted quarterly earnings topped Wall Street expectations

Business

Senate confirms former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to be agriculture secretary

Senate confirms former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to be agriculture secretary

Business

Figures on government spending and debt

Figures on government spending and debt in millions of dollars

Hasbro heads for the loo and business booms
Business

Hasbro heads for the loo and business booms

Business for Hasbro is in the toilet, which turns out to be a pretty good place

Business

Official: 'Silver lining' in hacker, foreign nation alliance

A top Justice Department national security official says foreign governments that work with criminal hackers make their operations vulnerable to being exposed and disrupted