Parenting tips: Raising a family & teaching kids for moms, dads - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

8 best moments to teach your kids financial responsibility

These tools teach money management -- now and in the future


More>>

Could a dishwasher raise your child's allergy, asthma risk?

Hand washing dishes instead of using a machine to wash dishes may reduce children's risk of developing allergic conditions, such as asthma or eczema, according to a new study. More>>

Teens, young adults most likely to go to ER after car accidents

In a finding that won't surprise many parents, a new government analysis shows that teens and young adults are the most likely to show up in a hospital ER with injuries suffered in a motor vehicle accident. More>>

How to have a baby without having a financial crisis

6 tips to help new parents put their money in order before bringing a child home


More>>

Good sleep habits, enforced rules help kids sleep

A regular bedtime and other sleep-related rules help children and teens get a good night's sleep, a new study suggests. More>>

The 5 best phones you can safely hand over to your kids’ grubby paws

These days, it takes more than simply ringing the steel triangle on your deck to round up the kids for supper.  More>>

Menu calorie counts may mean less fattening meals for kids

Parents might order fewer calories for their children if menus included calorie counts or information on how much walking would be required to burn off the calories in foods, a new study suggests. More>>

Many parents too quick to switch child car seats, study finds

Nearly three-quarters of American parents place their children in forward-facing car seats before it's safe to do so, a new study reveals. More>>

Few parents think 18-year-olds can handle their health care

Many American parents don't think their teen and young adult children are able to manage their own health care, a new survey finds. More>>

Mom, put down that smartphone at dinner

Harried mothers who want to stay close with their kids should put aside their smartphones and tablets at the dinner table, a new study suggests. More>>

Laundry detergent pods pose poisoning risk to kids

Laundry detergent "pods" seriously sickened more than 700 U.S. children and killed at least one in a recent two-year period, a new report reveals. More>>

'Social host' laws may help curb underage drinking

"Social host" laws, which hold adults accountable for any underage drinking that takes place on their property, may help curb teenage drinking, according to the preliminary findings of a new study. More>>

Teens who dine with their families may be slimmer adults

For those teens who try to avoid spending time with their parents and siblings, new research suggests that sitting down for family meals might help them stay slim as adults. More>>

Teen conflicts spill over to other areas of their lives

Teens' conflicts at home increase the risk of problems at school for up to two days, according to a new study. More>>

'Desensitized' parents let kids watch more movie violence, sex

When parents become desensitized to violence and sex in movies, they may also become more lax about their children's exposure to both onscreen, a new study suggests. More>>

Answers to kids' tough money questions

Smart ways to have the money talk. More>>

Do greener neighborhoods produce healthier babies?

Pregnant women who live in leafy, green neighborhoods are less likely to have premature or low birth weight babies, a new study suggests. More>>

The parenting trap: Coddling anxious kids

Some parents may make things worse for their anxious kids by falling into what researchers call the "protection trap" -- reassuring them, lavishing them with attention or making the threat go away, according to the... More>>

Parents' divorce may hit higher-income kids harder

When their parents split up, children in higher-income families -- but not those in lower-earning homes -- are more likely to develop behavior problems, a new study suggests. More>>

Mom's response to baby's cry a matter of memory

A mother's response to her baby's crying may be influenced by her own childhood, a new study reports. More>>

Sibling bullies may leave lasting effects

While a burly kid on the playground may be the stereotype of a childhood bully, a new study suggests some of the most damaging bullies are as close to home as you can get: They're siblings who tease, make fun of and... More>>

Music lessons may help bridge 'achievement gap'

A community music program for disadvantaged children boosted an important part of their brain development and function, according to a new study. More>>

This app will shut down your phone until you call your mom back

Many teenagers can withstand 10 missed calls from mom without batting an eyelash, but when you take away Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and everything else, most won't last five minutes without calling dear old mom and dad to beg for their freedom back. More>>

Fewer unmarried women having children

Fewer unmarried America women are having babies, with the notable exception of those who are over 35, federal health officials reported Wednesday. More>>

Back-to-school tips may help ease sensory overload in kids

Transitioning from summer to a new school year is hard for any kid, but it is particularly difficult for children who have trouble processing new sensations. More>>

Affordable family fun

© Jupiterimages / BananaStock / Thinstock © Jupiterimages / BananaStock / Thinstock

7 inexpensive summertime activities.

More>>

Protect your kids from the heat

Parents need to be aware that hot weather can pose a serious threat to children and must take steps to protect their youngsters, an expert says. More>>

Chronic migraines affect the whole family

When a spouse, partner or parent has chronic migraines, the whole family suffers, a new study found. More>>

Pediatrics group wants parents to read to their children every day

All pediatricians should encourage parents to read out loud to their children every day, beginning in infancy, to promote literacy and strengthen family ties. More>>

Study links pesticide exposure during pregnancy to autism risk in kids

Pregnant women who live within a mile of spaces where commercial pesticides are applied appear to have an increased risk of having a child with autism, a new study suggests. More>>

Tips for keeping that bounce house safe

Inflatable bounce houses may be fun for kids, but only if they're used correctly, experts caution. More>>

ER visits peak when kids barred from child care

Child care centers commonly bar parents from dropping off a child with a runny nose or other minor illness. And the result, a new study finds, can be needless trips to the emergency room. More>>

Recession forced many families to seek Medicaid coverage

During the last economic recession, the families of many children with chronic health conditions had to turn to Illinois' Medicaid program, Chicago researchers report. More>>

Combo vaccine raises risk of fever-related seizures in toddlers

Toddlers who get a newer vaccine that fights four infections in one jab have a slightly increased risk of fever-induced seizure, a large new study confirms. More>>

Gov't sets safety standards for infant formula

A new rule that aims to ensure the safety of infant formula has been finalized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. More>>

Anti-Alzheimer's drug shows promise in mice study

Researchers working with mice have identified a drug they believe holds promise as a preventive treatment for Alzheimer's disease. More>>

Hormone levels in womb tied to autism risk in boys

Some boys with autism may have been exposed to slightly elevated levels of certain hormones in the womb, a new study suggests -- though it's not clear yet what the finding means. More>>

More evidence links poor diet to preterm birth

Women with poor diets before pregnancy are more likely to give birth prematurely than women who have healthy diets, a new study from Australia confirms. More>>

Dad's brain becomes more 'maternal' when he's primary caregiver

Fathers who spend more time taking care of their newborn child undergo changes in brain activity that make them more apt to fret about their baby's safety, a new study shows. More>>

Iodine deficiency common in pregnancy, pediatricians warn

Many pregnant and breast-feeding women are deficient in iodine and should take a daily supplement containing iodide, according to a leading group of pediatricians. More>>

Cyberbullying knows no socio-economic bounds

Even though they have less access to online technologies, poor teens are as likely as middle-class and rich teens to be victims of cyberbullying, according to a new study. More>>

Jump in, just don't swallow the water

Taking a dip in the water can help refresh you on a hot day, but you need to protect yourself and your family from bacteria and parasites that can lurk in water, an infectious disease expert says. More>>

Foreclosures tied to higher suicide risk in study

Losing a home to foreclosure may boost a person's suicide risk, according to a new study that looked at pre- and post-"Great Recession" data. More>>

Delaying measles-related vaccines may raise seizure risk

Delaying certain routine immunizations past the first 15 months of life could boost the risk of fever-related seizures, new research suggests. More>>

Single moms' job loss may have long term impact on kids

Children of single mothers who lose their jobs can suffer significant long-term problems, a new study finds. More>>

Concussion rates double among high school athletes

The rate of concussions in U.S. high school athletes more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, new research shows. More>>

Injuries from swallowed magnets on the rise in kids

As the number of new and stronger magnet toys being sold has increased, so has the number of kids who have suffered serious injuries after swallowing a magnet, according to new research. More>>

Time outdoors may help kids connect with nature

Spending a lot of time outdoors boosts children's spiritual connection with the Earth and the sense that they need to protect it, researchers report. More>>

FDA asks public to join battle against youth smoking

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants your help in keeping children away from tobacco. More>>

College students' unhealthy habits can mark their future

College students tend to have unhealthy lifestyles that could increase their risk of cancer and other health problems later in life, a new study warns. More>>

Almost one in 20 young teens binge drinks

It's not just high school or college kids who 'binge' drink: a Canadian survey finds that 4 percent of 12- to 14-year-olds in that country got drunk at least once in the past year. More>>

Pets can carry same 'superbug' strains as their owners

A new study may provide the best evidence yet that the superbug known as MRSA can travel between humans and their pets, although researchers caution that people shouldn't worry too much.
More>>

Can doing the dishes save a young marriage?

Newlywed couples who have similar expectations for dividing household chores are more likely to have longer-lasting marriages, a new study suggests. More>>

Kids' concussion symptoms can linger long after injury

Kids who suffer a concussion can have lingering effects long after the physical symptoms fade away, U.S. researchers report. More>>

Smoking more likely among teens whose parents light up

Teen children of heavy smokers are more likely to try cigarettes and to become heavy smokers themselves, a new study suggests. More>>

Drug therapy may lower odds that kids with ADHD will smoke

Children taking medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) -- such as Adderall, Ritalin and Vyvanse -- are less likely to smoke, according to a new analysis. More>>

Frequent arguments might be the death of you

Arguing and worrying over family problems may lead to an increased risk of dying in middle age, Danish researchers report. More>>

Prenatal fish oil supplements may not boost child's brain health

SATURDAY, May 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) - Despite public health recommendations that women consume omega-3 fatty acid supplements while pregnant, new research suggests that offspring do not gain any mental health benefit. More>>

Despite childhood obesity epidemic, few kids tested for cholesterol

Even though rising obesity rates are contributing to higher cholesterol levels among young Americans, less than 4 percent of U.S. children had their cholesterol levels checked between 1995 and 2010, new research shows. More>>

Older infertile couples should try in vitro fertilization first

Middle-aged couples who want to have a baby but are having trouble conceiving should go straight to in vitro fertilization (IVF), skipping other types of fertility treatment, a new clinical trial recommends. More>>

Kids with ADHD may also suffer family troubles

New research indicates that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may be more likely to be part of families that are affected by poverty, divorce, neighborhood violence and substance abuse. More>>

Skills like walking, talking don't come easily for minority kids with autism

Minority children with autism are more likely to have lost critical developmental skills, such as walking or talking, than are white children, according to a new study. More>>

US task force: Doctors should give toddlers fluoride treatments

Primary care doctors should start playing a more prominent role in dental care for children, according to new recommendations from the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. More>>

Could energy drinks be wrong choice for some teens?

Teens who regularly drink energy and sports drinks tend to engage in some unhealthy behaviors, new research suggests. More>>

Violent older siblings set bad example

When older siblings commit violent crimes, their younger siblings are more likely to do the same, a new study suggests. More>>

Spanking may be more common than parents admit

Ask any busy parent of preschool children: Early evening can be a stressful time. Now a small new study that audiotaped families soon after they returned home from work and day care suggests that spanking is surprisingly... More>>

By 9 months, baby's visual learning kicks in

By the time they're 9 months old, babies can use pictures to learn about an object and later recognize the real thing, researchers say.
More>>

Induced labor may lower risk for C-section

Pregnant women whose labor is induced are 12 percent less likely to need a cesarean delivery than those whose doctors take a "wait-and-see" approach, a new review of the data shows. More>>

'Breast milk banks' gain in popularity

A wave of new nonprofit breast milk banks are opening across North America, driven by research that has promoted the use of donated mother's milk for healthy babies. More>>

Gastro woes more common in kids with autism

What many parents of children with autism have long suspected -- that autism and gastrointestinal complaints often go together -- is now supported by a new study. More>>

Single motherhood doesn't seem to hinder happiness

Single mothers face many challenges but they tend to be happy, a new study suggests. More>>

Kids' happiness doesn't depend on 2 natural parents

Children who live with a stepparent or a single parent are just as happy as kids in homes with two biological parents, a new British study finds.
More>>

Language problems common for kids with ADHD

Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research. More>>

Too much codeine still prescribed to U.S. kids

Emergency room physicians still hand out hundreds of thousands of codeine prescriptions for children every year, despite warnings that kids' responses to codeine vary wildly.
More>>

Father time: Make every day Father's Day

This Father's Day, take a minute to think about the kind of dad you want be. More>>

Campfire precautions can protect kids from burns

Campfires are exciting for kids but they also can be dangerous without supervision and simple precautions, an expert warns. More>>

Crankier babies may get more TV time

Fussy and demanding babies are likely to spend slightly more time plopped in front of a TV or computer screen when they're toddlers than are "easier" babies, new research finds. More>>

Kids' concussions defined by where they live

City kids are more likely to suffer concussions playing sports while children in rural areas tend to sustain these head injuries while using dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, a new Canadian study finds. More>>

Aspirin advised for women at high risk for pregnancy complication

Pregnant women at high risk for the serious condition called preeclampsia should take low-dose aspirin every day after their first trimester, according to a new draft recommendation by an influential U.S. panel of experts. More>>

Could daughter's cancer risk be affected by father's age at birth?

A father's age at the time of his daughter's birth may affect her risk for breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer in adulthood, a new study suggests. More>>

Teens' screen time may affect their bone health

Spending too much time sitting in front of screens may be linked to poorer bone health in teens, according to a new study from Norway. More>>

For greater happiness, spend your money on 'life experiences'

Buying so-called "life experiences" makes Americans happier than material goods such as cars, but they tend to favor the latter in the mistaken belief that they provide better value, according to a new study. More>>

Popular kids may be targets for bullying

Becoming more popular might have a downside for teens -- it may increase their risk of being bullied, researchers say. More>>

Parental messages that stress no alcohol do get through

Making it clear to your teen that underage drinking is unacceptable is a highly effective way to reduce the risk that he or she will use alcohol, a new survey shows. More>>

Lung ultrasound can spot risk of respiratory failure in pregnancy

A lung ultrasound can quickly reveal if a pregnant woman with a serious condition called preeclampsia is at risk for respiratory failure, according to a new study. More>>

Toddlers who sleep less may eat more

Toddlers who get too little sleep tend to eat more and are at increased risk for obesity, a new study indicates. More>>

Spanking triggers vicious cycle

Parents who spank unruly children may not know it, but they are participating in a vicious cycle that will lead to both more spankings and more misbehavior in coming years, a new study suggests. More>>

How you parent is partly genetic

Genes may play a major role in parenting styles, according to a new study. More>>

Head lice growing resistant to standard meds

Most head lice found in North America now carry a gene mutation that makes them resistant to standard over-the-counter treatments, a new study cautions. More>>

Lower IQ, worse heart fitness in teens linked to risk of early dementia in men

Having a lower IQ or poorer fitness at age 18 might increase a man's risk of developing dementia before age 60, a new study suggests. More>>

ADHD drugs linked to later weight gain in kids

Children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to gain more weight than their peers as they enter their teen years, a new study finds. More>>

Teens often copycat others who drink and drive

Want to make sure your teen doesn't drive while intoxicated? You might want to start by making sure he or she doesn't go riding with peers who have been drinking or using drugs. More>>

Mental illness to blame for 10 percent of kids' hospitalizations

Nearly 10 percent of children hospitalized in America are there because of a mental health problem, a new study finds. More>>

For young couples, violence can harm both sides

Teens and young adults involved in relationship violence are more likely to suffer depression, a new study indicates. More>>

Rising e-cigarette use tied to more smoking in teens

Teens who have tried electronic cigarettes may be more likely to smoke regular cigarettes, according to the authors of a new study. More>>

September peak month for kids' asthma flares

Many parents know that allergies are seasonal, but fewer may realize that the same is true of asthma: A new study suggests the riskiest time for children with asthma is September, as they head back to school. More>>

Alcohol near start of pregnancy linked to premature babies

Women who drink before they conceive or during the first three months of pregnancy might be at increased risk of having a premature or small baby, new research finds. More>>

When smartphone is near, parenting may falter

Mealtime is supposed to be family time, but a new study suggests that ever-present smartphones are impeding parent-child communication at the table. More>>

Despite media companies' claims, your baby can't learn to read

Read to your baby, sing and play games. But don't waste money on programs that claim to teach infants to read, a new study suggests. More>>

Does your child's car seat weigh too much for LATCH?

Car seats are heavier than ever--and some parents aren't including that weight when they fit their kids and car seats to LATCH systems. More>>

Treatment costs vary for U.S. children born with heart defects

The cost of treatment for children born with heart defects varies widely across the United States, according to new research. And higher costs may not mean better care. More>>

Food allergies have nearly doubled among black children

Over the past two decades, reports of food allergies have nearly doubled among black children, a new study reveals. More>>

Schools add more fruits, veggies to the '3 Rs'

Under new U.S. guidelines on school lunches, low-income students are eating more fruits and vegetables, according to a new study. More>>

Are you addicted to being too busy?

These days, having a crammed work, kids and activities schedule has almost become a status symbol. But being super-busy isn’t always a sign of a fulfilling life More>>

Your guide to keeping kids healthy

Your kids may come home from school this winter with something more worrisome than homework -- sniffles, tummy bugs and even (ick!) lice. More>>

Get your kids cooking with you

Is your dinner table a battlefield? You aren't alone. But your child isn't doomed to a diet of white bread and chicken nuggets -- there's hope. Kids are more likely to try foods that they had a hand in cooking.
More>>

Start your own Christmas morning traditions

Here are seven holiday activities to slow down and make the morning more magical and memorable for both you and your children.
More>>

Thanksgiving craft ideas for keeping kids busy

Sure, some tots will play a board game quietly in the corner, but if you’ve got a crew with a bit more energy, read on for Thanksgiving craft ideas to keep them occupied this holiday season.
More>>

Best road trips, coast to coast

Pack up and take your pick of these primo family-friendly routes.
More>>

Family-friendly historical trips

Looking to plan a family vacation that is both entertaining and educational? Go historical.
More>>

Surviving a power outage with kids

Tech-loving kids can make a blackout feel like an eternity -- if you don’t have a plan in place. Turn this surprise into a period of family bonding and fun with the following ideas.
More>>

BeLuvv Guardian is a LoJack-like system for tracking small kids

The Guardian is a small, tracking device to be worn by a child as a bracelet or necklace. When combined with a mobile application, the radio chip communicates with the parent's mobile device and can send an alert when the child has traveled too far away.
More>>

How to raise cultured kids

Do you long for your child to choose the symphony over SpongeBob and couscous over mac ’n’ cheese? Raising a cultured kid can be easier than you think.
More>>

The smart mom's kitchen

Cooking at home is more cost-effective than ordering in, better for your family’s health, and if you do it right, quicker, too. Check out this list of items you should always have in stock for delicious, kid-friendly 30-minute meals.
More>>

5 digital ways to stay close to grandparents

These days, extended families are more likely to be spread out. The good news is, today's grandparents are more tech-savvy than they were even five years ago.
More>>

The biggest car seat mistakes parents make

With the kids back at school and parents' schedules more hectic, mid-September is a good time for a reminder of proper car-seat safety. Sept. 15 to Sept. 21 is also Child Passenger Safety Week. More>>

Is social media making your kids less smart?

Will the amount of time your child spends tweeting and sharing online affect their grades?
More>>

3 ways to relive your favorite summer memories

A new school year may be fast approaching, but that doesn’t mean the fun has to end just yet.
More>>

4 best train trips in America

When you think about it, a family vacation by train is a no-brainer. The price is right, the scenery terrific, and everyone’s in a good mood.

 
More>>

Healthy summer snacks for kids

This summer make your own kid snacks rather than purchasing premade snacks. You'll have a better idea of what your kids are eating and you'll probably save money at the grocery store.
More>>

One in three teens "just not interested" in driving

Less than half of all American teenagers get their first driver's license within a year of becoming eligible to drive, a new study from AAA says.
More>>

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2015 WorldNow and Quincy Herald-Whig. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.