Lost 19th century artworks of Edward Everett return to Quincy
Once Upon a Time

Lost 19th century artworks of Edward Everett return to Quincy

Eager for business when he arrived in Quincy from London with his family in 1840, Edward Everett, 22, did not consider himself an artist. In city directories and military records, he referred to himself as a mechanic and engineer.

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First baby born at Blessing remains a mystery
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First baby born at Blessing remains a mystery

In October 1952, Myrtle McAhren, administrator of Blessing Hospital, received a letter from Mary Eliza Bushnell McCoy of Wichita Falls, Texas. She claimed to be the first baby born in Blessing Hospital in 1875.

City played a role in Old West cattle drives
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City played a role in Old West cattle drives

Actors like John Wayne and Gary Cooper made the legends of cowboys part of American folklore.

Train met tragedy on Mississippi River railroad bridge
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Train met tragedy on Mississippi River railroad bridge

A railroad bridge was first built over the Mississippi River at Quincy in 1868. The bridge held one track but needed to accommodate travel in both directions across the river.

Six carriers first delivered mail in city in 1873
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Six carriers first delivered mail in city in 1873

Delivery of mail in Quincy started July 1, 1873, with six routes and six letter carriers.

Knights of Columbus flourished in Industrial Age
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Knights of Columbus flourished in Industrial Age

The United States' Industrial Revolution burgeoned in the late 19th century along with the Golden Age of Fraternalism, as labor unions, insurance companies and social service agencies formed and spread across the land to help newly employed workers.

Governor from Quincy misconstrued his celebrity as popularity
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Governor from Quincy misconstrued his celebrity as popularity

In 19th century Illinois, only the city of Chicago could claim more representatives in state and national political offices than Quincy. Reviewing the list of Quincy's pre-eminent politicians on Feb. 18, 1883, the Quincy Daily Herald indicated that "gener

Quincy lumber man became 'Illinois' Fighting Major'
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Quincy lumber man became 'Illinois' Fighting Major'

In July 1862, President Abraham Lincoln called for 300,000 more volunteers to put down the rebellion and restore the Union. Twenty-year-old George Green answered the president's call and enlisted in a local company.

Quincy couple make rare journey to Alaska in 1895
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Quincy couple make rare journey to Alaska in 1895

Today many people in the Quincy area visit Alaska at least once to see the mountains, fjords, wildlife, and native culture and history. Few travelers visited Alaska in the 19th century, but Edward Jarvis "E.J." Parker and his second wife, Elizabeth Goodwi

Slain abolitionist had friends, sympathizers in Quincy
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Slain abolitionist had friends, sympathizers in Quincy

Elijah Lovejoy's Quincy friends and colleagues lobbied for him to begin a newspaper in that city after his third printing press was destroyed in Alton. The antislavery editor remained in this slave-trading area, and was killed in 1837.