Health

The Latest: Analysts say insurers figuring out 'Obamacare'

The HealthCare.gov website is photographed in Washington on Dec. 15, 2017. Millions of people covered under the Affordable Care Act will see only modest premium increases next year, and some will actually get a price cut. That’s from an exclusive analysis bound to surprise ‘Obamacare’ opponents and supporters. The study of state data by Avalere Health and The Associated Press also found that insurers aren’t bailing out of the ACA marketplaces anymore; some are coming back. The average premium increase across 47 states and Washington, D.C. will be 3.6 percent in 2019. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
Posted: Sep. 7, 2018 7:00 am Updated: Sep. 7, 2018 12:13 pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Affordable Care Act health insurance premiums (all times local):

6:30 a.m.

Business analysts say the leveling off in premiums next year under the Affordable Care Act means insurers have figured out how to make a profit on the politically contentious program.

Deep Banerjee (BAN'-ur-jee) of Standard & Poor's says insurers who stuck with the ACA have gotten to know the health needs of their mostly low-income customers and learned to price their plans accordingly.

An exclusive analysis by the consulting firm Avalere Health and The Associated Press finds "Obamacare" appears to be stabilizing after two years of sharp premium increases.

The analysis found a 3.6 percent average increase in proposed or approved premiums across 47 states and Washington, D.C., for next year. Eleven states will a drop.

But Banerjee still sees a "cloud of uncertainty" over the ACA because of the Trump administration's hostility.

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3:05 a.m.

Millions of people covered under the Affordable Care Act will see only modest premium increases next year, and some will get a price cut.

That's from an exclusive analysis of "Obamacare," the besieged but resilient program that still sparks deep divisions heading into this year's midterm elections.

The consulting firm Avalere Health and The Associated Press crunched state data and found that health insurance marketplaces appear to be stabilizing after years of sharp premium hikes.

The analysis found a 3.6 percent average increase in proposed or approved premiums across 47 states and Washington, D.C., for 2019. Eleven states will see a drop.

This year premiums averaged about 30 percent higher.

And the exodus of ACA insurers has halted. Nineteen states will see new insurers enter, or current ones expand.

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