Bridge the Gap - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Herald-Whig's Live Stream of Bridge the Gap Finish Line

We live streamed the finish line of Saturday's Bridge the Gap to Health Race. Below is a recording of the first 2 hours, 4 minutes and 42 seconds of participants crossing the finish line. Four more segments of the live stream are published below. The video is published in segments because of brief wifi network interruptions during the live event. Congratulations to all the finishers.


Video streaming by Ustream

The recording below is the next 14 minutes and 20 seconds of participants crossing the finish line.


Video streaming by Ustream

The recording below is the next 2 minutes and 59 seconds of participants crossing the finish line.


Video streaming by Ustream

The recording below is the next 23 seconds of participants crossing the finish line.


Video streaming by Ustream

The recording below is the final 44 minutes and 24 seconds of participants crossing the finish line.


Video streaming by Ustream
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