Live Well: Allergies, diet, healthy lifestyle, tips, advice - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Additives in processed foods may alter gut bacteria

A common ingredient in many processed foods might increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and metabolic syndrome, a new study in mice suggests. More>>

U.S. dietary guidelines take aim at sugar

Stop chugging sugary soda and munching sweet treats. Cut back on red meats, butter and other sources of saturated fat. Lay off the salt shaker. Eat plenty of fruits and veggies. And don't worry about having an egg and... More>>

Hungry in the department store? Your spending may rise

Worried about rising credit card bills? A new study points to one way to curb your spending: Don't shop while hungry. More>>

10 potential hazards in a beauty salon

To avoid ruining your look, and your health, be on the lookout for these 10 potential health hazards the next time you go to the beauty salon.

More>>

Healthy eating up worldwide, but unhealthy eating up even more

Although people around the world are eating more healthy foods, that positive trend has been outpaced by a rising consumption of unhealthy foods, a new study finds. More>>

3 ways to beat the winter blues

Here's why you may be sad when all is well, and what you can do about it.

More>>

Proposed dietary guidelines not a green light to eat what you want

People who follow a heart-healthy diet won't see much change in their eating habits if, as reported, this year's U.S. Dietary Guidelines report rescinds previous warnings against eating certain cholesterol-rich foods. More>>

Naps may improve your health

Brief daytime naps might protect you against the harmful health effects of a poor night's sleep, a new study suggests. More>>

Health benefits of moderate drinking overblown

All that talk of red wine and other alcoholic beverages being good for your health if consumed in moderation is just plain wrong, a new analysis contends. More>>

10 healthy Valentine’s Day gifts for her

This year, instead of the same old Valentine's Day plan, buy your special lady a gift that's good for her health to really show how much you care. More>>

Menu calorie counts may mean less fattening meals for kids

Parents might order fewer calories for their children if menus included calorie counts or information on how much walking would be required to burn off the calories in foods, a new study suggests. More>>

Looking to boost your exercise level? Here are some helpful tips

The excitement and anticipation surrounding the upcoming Super Bowl may prompt some people to take up a new sport or up their levels of physical activity. More>>

Clean up your home's water supply

Drinking water is an absolute necessity of life, but how clean is the water you drink?
More>>

Work hard, party harder?

Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries. More>>

Less booze, more veggies might lower odds for some cancers

Eating a plant-based diet and limiting your alcohol intake may help cut your risk for obesity-related cancers, a new study suggests. More>>

7 good luck foods for the New Year

Read this list and start preparing dishes to make this year one of your best ever. More>>

New year often ushers in pledge to quit drinking

People with drinking problems often make a New Year's pledge to stop or cut back on their drinking, but actually doing it can be a struggle, an addiction expert says. More>>

10 stress management tips to survive the holidays

The holidays are supposed to be a time of great joy, but they can also be a time of a ridiculous amount of stress. If holiday stress has become a major downer for you over the years, here are 10 tips that may help. More>>

Obesity-related ills may shave up to 8 years off your life

The heart disease and diabetes that often accompany obesity may rob people of almost a decade of life and close to two decades of a healthy life, Canadian researchers report. More>>

Study links running to lower Alzheimer's death risk

©   ©  

Running more than 15 miles a week may reduce the risk of dying from Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. More>>

Could a 'Mediterranean' diet extend your life?

©   ©  

There are hints in a new study that eating the much-lauded Mediterranean diet may help boost longevity. More>>

10 tips to fight Thanksgiving Day food coma

After consuming mass quantities of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and pumpkin pie during a feast, it's no mystery why people just plop on the couch and pass out. However, there are ways to avoid the Thanksgiving Day food coma, if you're up to it.

More>>

Every kiss begins with 80 million germs

A kiss isn't just a kiss: It's also an opportunity to transfer millions of germs. More>>

How cold indoor temperatures can harm your health

Whether due to inadequate insulation or an inefficient heating system, an underheated home feels chilly and unwelcoming. Even worse, cold temperatures inside can have a decidedly negative effect on your health. More>>

Can lots of sex protect the prostate?

Don Juans of the world, take note: Men who sleep with lots of women may be less likely to develop prostate cancer than men who don't play the field, a new Canadian study suggests. More>>

Upbeat walking style might lift your mood

The way you walk can affect your mood, according to a new study. More>>

As culture changed, so did melanoma risk, study finds

Changing fashions, cultural attitudes and health beliefs have contributed to the rise of deadly melanoma skin cancer, according to a new study. More>>

Top five myths about cellulite

Cellulite, fat deposits beneath the skin, plagues the thighs and behinds of nearly 90 percent of women -- even the most fit among us. More>>

6 health hazards of a dirty movie theater

Here are six health hazards that you might find at a dirty movie theater: More>>

Can all work and no play make you diabetic?

Working long hours may increase your risk for diabetes, a new study suggests. But the finding seems to depend on your job. More>>

Soda giants pledge to make calorie cuts in their drinks

The top U.S. soda makers have agreed to help reduce Americans' consumption of calories from sugary beverages by one-fifth during the next decade -- by shrinking drink sizes and marketing healthier options. More>>

Drinking alcohol more common on exercise days

People tend to drink more alcohol on days when they're more physically active, a new study finds. More>>

Better-educated people more open to dubious health info on Web

Younger college graduates are more likely to trust health information from questionable sources on the Internet than older high school grads would, new research reports. More>>

Do greener neighborhoods produce healthier babies?

Pregnant women who live in leafy, green neighborhoods are less likely to have premature or low birth weight babies, a new study suggests. More>>

Novel weight-loss drug is approved

A new weight-loss medication for the overweight and obese has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration. More>>

'Fat shaming' doesn't motivate obese people to lose weight

Discrimination against overweight or obese people, commonly known as "fat shaming," does not help them lose weight and may do more harm than good, according to research from London. More>>

Why polyester fails the B.O. test after exercise

The reason polyester clothes smell worse than cotton apparel after a hard workout is because odor-causing bacteria grow better on them, a new study shows. More>>

Breast-feeding may help obese moms lose pregnancy pounds

Breast-feeding may help women lose their pregnancy weight and keep it off if they were obese before they became pregnant, according to new research. More>>

Quality of U.S. diet improves, slightly

The quality of Americans' diets has improved somewhat but remains poor overall, and dietary disparity between the rich and poor is growing, a new study shows. More>>

Education linked to activity levels during the week

College-educated Americans tend to be more physically active on weekends, while adults without a high school diploma are more active on weekdays, a new study finds. More>>

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans drinks at least 1 soda a day

A new survey of American adults across 18 states finds 17 percent drinking at least one sugary soda per day, with rates varying widely across states. More>>

Popular southern fare may harm your kidneys

The types of food that many Southerners seem to prefer -- fried foods, sweet drinks and processed meals -- may be deadly for people with kidney disease, a new study suggests. More>>

Sperm's anti-germ 'shield' might play role in fertility

Preliminary new research points to the possibility that some infertile men could benefit from boosting a protein shield that protects sperm cells from germs. More>>

Acidic drinks can damage kids' teeth permanently

High acidity levels in soft drinks, fruit juice and sports beverages pose a threat to youngsters' teeth, a new study reports. More>>

Fruits, veggies may have their limits in boosting lifespan

The nutrients in fruits and vegetables are vital to good health and a long life, but only up to a point.  More>>

Healthy habits may help childhood cancer survivors avoid chronic ills

Following a healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors reduce their risk for chronic health issues, a new study indicates. More>>

Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study. More>>

Weight loss surgery may help ease urinary incontinence

Weight-loss surgery appears to have an additional side benefit -- it may improve urinary incontinence symptoms in women, according to a new study. More>>

Exercise may help counter health risks of sedentary lifestyle

Being a couch potato may have fewer long-term health consequences if you trade some of your couch time for gym time, suggests a new study. More>>

Make exercise fun, eat less afterwards

If you make exercise fun, you'll eat less after your workout, new research contends. More>>

Organic foods may be healthier

Organic produce and grains contain more protective antioxidants, less pesticide residue and lower levels of the toxic metal cadmium than food raised in traditional ways, a new review finds. More>>

Staying active may help prevent dementia

Being physically active in middle age appears to help reduce your risk for Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, suggest the findings from two new studies. More>>

A little alcohol may not be good for your heart after all

A new study challenges the widely held belief that light drinking of alcohol may be good for your heart. More>>

60 percent of diners use calorie labeling when posted

About six out of 10 adults make use of calorie information on menus, if it's available, to decide what to order in restaurants, according to a new U.S. study. More>>

Around the globe, mom's health key to newborn's size

Well-nourished, healthy and well-educated mothers who receive prenatal care have babies of similar size - regardless of differences in their race, ethnicity or where they live, a new study finds. More>>

Fruits, veggies not a magic bullet for weight loss

Eating lots of fruits and vegetables is often recommended as a way to lose weight, but doing so may not help you shed excess pounds, according to researchers. More>>

Healthy weight loss may bring better sleep, brighter mood

Dropping excess pounds may not only improve your physical health, it might also help you feel more awake and happy, a new study shows. More>>

Diets high in dairy might boost colon cancer survival, a bit

A diet rich in dairy products may slightly extend the lives of people diagnosed with colon cancer, a new study suggests. More>>

FDA: Bee pollen weight loss products pose health risks

Some bee pollen products marketed for weight loss may actually threaten your health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. More>>

The effects of wearing high heels

Like many other forms of fashion folly of days gone by, researchers have discovered that wearing high heels, even for a relatively short period of time, can have some major effects on the body. More>>

Soy foods don't seem to protect against uterine cancer

There's no evidence that soy foods protect against uterine cancer, a large Japanese study reports. More>>

10 anti-aging tips to make yourself look younger

Since you can’t wish yourself younger, you’ll just have to defy aging the old-fashioned way -- by trying these 10 anti-aging tips to make yourself look younger. More>>

Exercise may spur more varied gut microbes

Exercise can increase the diversity of bacteria found in the gut, possibly boosting the immune system and improving long-term health, British researchers report. More>>

Cellphone exposure may harm male fertility

Men who carry a cellphone in their pants pocket may harm their sperm and reduce their chances of having children, a new review warns. More>>

Too-clean homes may encourage child allergies, asthma

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, but a home that's too clean can leave a newborn child vulnerable to allergies and asthma later in life, a new study reports. More>>

Yoga may not help ease asthma

Although yoga is believed to boost physical and mental health, it does not seem to help ease symptoms of asthma, a new study finds. More>>

Bicyclists happier than drivers, train riders

Riding a bike may benefit your mind as well as your body. People who use a bicycle to get from one place to another are generally happier than those who drive or use mass transit, according to a new study.
More>>

Could white bread be making you fat?

If you're watching your weight, you may have to watch your white bread consumption, too. More>>

FDA orders new warning labels for tanning beds

Just in time for summer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday that tanning beds and tanning booths now must carry a visible warning explicitly stating that the devices should not be used on people... More>>

Fast weight loss may mean muscle loss

If you lose weight too fast, you lose more muscle than when you shed excess pounds more slowly, a small study says. More>>

Mediterranean diet may keep kids slimmer

Children who eat a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely to be overweight or obese than other youngsters, a new study suggests. More>>

Tips for staying safe in the sun

The Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of summer, and that means it's time to remind you about sun safety to reduce your risk of skin cancer. More>>

Losing weight at any age may help the heart

Healthy weight loss at any time in adulthood is good for your heart, a new study indicates. More>>

Sperm, semen defects may be linked to shorter life spans

Men rendered infertile due to defects in their semen and sperm are more likely to die early than men with normal semen, new research suggests. More>>

There may be such a thing as 'too much exercise'

Is there a limit to the benefits of exercise? Two studies suggest that, for certain people, keeping to a moderate physical activity regimen may be best for heart health. More>>

Syphilis cases climbing among gay men

Syphilis has returned with a vengeance to the gay community, U.S. health officials reported Friday. More>>

Skin cancer prevention tips you can use

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives, making it the most common type of cancer in the nation. More>>

40 isn't too old to start intensive exercise

Men who begin endurance exercise after age 40 may get similar long-term heart benefits as those who start training before age 30, new research finds. More>>

Could a few beers a week cut a woman's rheumatoid arthritis risk?

Having a beer a few times a week might help women avoid painful rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests. More>>

Prenatal fish oil supplements may not boost child's brain health

SATURDAY, May 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) - Despite public health recommendations that women consume omega-3 fatty acid supplements while pregnant, new research suggests that offspring do not gain any mental health benefit. More>>

US task force: Doctors should give toddlers fluoride treatments

Primary care doctors should start playing a more prominent role in dental care for children, according to new recommendations from the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. More>>

Ironclad findings about red meat's harms?

A type of iron found only in red meat is associated with an increase in the risk of heart disease, a new review finds. More>>

Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better. More>>

How to keep your fitness goals on track

The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high. More>>

Extroverts happier regardless of culture

Being outgoing makes you happier no matter where you live, a new international study says. More>>

Crunchy or smooth? Food's texture may sway perception of calories

Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices. More>>

Yoga big on West Coast, chiropractors popular in Midwest

Folks on the West Coast are faithful followers of yoga and meditation. Midwesterners turn to chiropractors or osteopathic doctors for their aches and pains. More>>

Less salt use tied to drop in British heart deaths

A drop in salt consumption likely played a big role in a recent large reduction in deaths related to heart disease and stroke in England, a new study suggests. More>>

A doctor's 'people skills' affects patients' health

A doctor's "bedside manner" seems to have a real effect on patients' health, a new research review suggests. More>>

Beans, lentils, peas: Your recipe for lower cholesterol?

Eating beans, lentils and other legumes may help you cut down on LDL "bad" cholesterol and lower your risk for heart disease, a new review suggests. More>>

CDC salt guidelines too low for good health

Don't toss out your salt shaker just yet: A new analysis from Denmark finds current recommended salt guidelines may be too low. More>>

Too much running tied to shorter life span

Running regularly has long been linked to a host of health benefits, including weight control, stress reduction, better blood pressure and cholesterol. More>>

Fruits and veggies may reduce death risk

A diet filled with fresh produce is good for your health, and now a large study suggests that eating plenty of fruits and vegetables may substantially cut your risk of death. More>>

Stronger muscles may mean better health for kids

Preteens with strong muscles may have healthier blood pressure, cholesterol and body-fat levels than their less brawny peers, a new study suggests. More>>

Fewer Americans would smoke if cessation treatments were covered

More Americans would quit smoking if coverage for every type of smoking-cessation treatment was provided by all state Medicaid programs, and if states removed barriers to coverage, according to a federal government study. More>>

Smoking bans linked to drop in premature births, kids' asthma attacks

Bans on smoking in public places and the workplace in North America and Europe are linked to a 10 percent drop in premature births and the number of children going to the hospital for an asthma flare-up. More>>

Marathon training might boost heart health

Marathon training may be a good way for middle-aged men to reduce their risk of heart problems, a new study suggests. More>>

Exercise affects men's, women's hearts differently

The formula doctors use to evaluate treadmill stress tests, and thereby assess heart health, doesn't account for important differences between men and women, a new study contends. More>>

Take heart: Mediterranean diet combats diabetes

Adhering to a so-called Mediterranean diet may reduce your risk of diabetes, especially if you're at high risk for heart disease. More>>

Ways to cut your colon cancer risk

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death, but there are ways of reducing your risk. More>>

When moms get active, kids follow

Want to keep your little kids active? A new study suggests that mothers may be the key: Preschool children with more active moms appear more likely to be active themselves. More>>

More muscles linked to longer life

The more muscle older adults have, the lower their risk of death, according to a new study. More>>

Offices with open floor plans tied to more sick days

Offices with open floor plans and no individual workstations may take a toll on employee health, a new study from Sweden suggests. More>>

Keep your heart healthy

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and 49 percent of adults have at least one risk factor for the disease.
More>>

Flu can infect many without causing symptoms

Think you know who has the flu? Think again: a new study finds that three-quarters of people infected with seasonal flu and swine flu in recent years showed no symptoms. More>>

'Five-second' food rule may be real

The five-second rule -- pick up that dropped food on the floor fast if you want to safely eat it -- may have some basis in reality, researchers report. More>>

Protein from meat, fish may help men age well

Older men may gain a boost physically, mentally and socially if they eat a diet rich in meat and fish, according to a new study from Japan. More>>

Weed use up, cocaine use down

Americans' use of cocaine fell by half from 2006 to 2010, but marijuana use increased by more than 30 percent during that time, according to a new report. More>>

Do harder working husbands have healthier wives?

Husbands beware: Wives now have another reason to want you to work longer and harder. The more a male spouse works, the healthier his wife will be, new research suggests. More>>

Balanced diet during pregnancy may lower risk of preterm delivery

Expectant mothers are often told to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and a new study adds to evidence that a healthy diet is linked to a reduced risk of premature birth. More>>

Diet to reduce blood pressure may also stave off kidney stones

A diet originally designed to lower blood pressure may also be effective for preventing kidney stones, according to a new study. More>>

Schools add more fruits, veggies to the '3 Rs'

Under new U.S. guidelines on school lunches, low-income students are eating more fruits and vegetables, according to a new study. More>>

FDA's new food labels would focus on calories, sugar content

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration formally proposed Thursday updating the "nutrition facts" labels on food products to better reflect Americans' current eating habits and health concerns. More>>

Are you addicted to being too busy?

These days, having a crammed work, kids and activities schedule has almost become a status symbol. But being super-busy isn’t always a sign of a fulfilling life More>>

10 heart-healthy Valentine’s dinner date ideas

Before you head out with your date or loved-one wrapped around your arm, take a moment to consider a few of these tips to keep your special, Valentine's Day dinner a little more heart-healthy. More>>

5 naturally soothing scents

While we can’t always crawl into bed at any given hour in the day, we can surround ourselves with calming aromas at anytime. Here are five scents that have been proven to naturally soothe.
More>>

Your guide to keeping kids healthy

Your kids may come home from school this winter with something more worrisome than homework -- sniffles, tummy bugs and even (ick!) lice. More>>

5 ways to keep skin healthy all winter

Between the cold dry air outdoors and the hot dry air indoors, skin definitely needs a little more TLC. Read on to find out how to winter-proof your skin care routine. More>>

Weight fluctuations: Why does the scale say that?

Most women play some version of the scale game whenever they weigh themselves, but the truth is there are at least eight reasons why the numbers can fluctuate so much. More>>

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2015 WorldNow and Quincy Herald-Whig. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.