Parenting tips: Raising a family & teaching kids for moms, dads - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Severe 'picky eating' may point to mental health issues in kids

A kid who is a seriously "picky eater" is also likely to struggle with emotional problems like anxiety and depression, new research suggests. More>>

Too much Facebook, Twitter tied to poor mental health in teens

Teens who frequently use social media are more likely to say they struggle with mental health concerns that are not being addressed, new Canadian research reveals. More>>

Weight at first pregnancy linked to complications next time

Women with an unhealthy weight in a first pregnancy could be at greater risk for complications in their next pregnancy -- even if they're at a good weight, a new study finds. More>>

New moms often get poor advice on baby care

New mothers get conflicting advice from medical professionals, family members and the media when it comes to key parenting topics, a recent study found. More>>

Hormone linked to social difficulties with autism

Low levels of a certain hormone may play a role in the social difficulties that children with autism spectrum disorders experience, new research suggests. More>>

Banning soccer 'headers' won't solve concussion problem

While many experts have called for a ban on "heading" the ball in youth soccer because they believe it is a leading cause of concussions, a new study suggests the body contact that often occurs during such play is to blame for most brain injuries. More>>

What's in a name? For newborns, maybe fewer medical errors

Using more specific names for newborns may reduce hospital mix-ups by roughly a third, a new study suggests. More>>

Cost of hospital birth varies by nearly $10,000 across U.S.

The cost of having a baby in a hospital varies by nearly $10,000 across the United States, a new study finds. More>>

Another study sees link between antidepressants and birth defects

New research provides more evidence of a possible link between antidepressant use early in pregnancy and a small increased risk of birth defects. More>>

Anti-vaccine trend has parents shunning newborns' vitamin shot

With the recent U.S. measles outbreak, the issue of vaccine refusal has received growing scrutiny. Now doctors are calling attention to a similar problem: Some parents are shunning the vitamin K shot routinely given to newborns to prevent internal bleeding. More>>

Parents, stop hovering: 'Risky' play may have benefits for kids

Children may benefit, physically and socially, from being allowed to play with less monitoring from mom and dad, a new research review finds. More>>

1 in 5 teens may be bullied on social media

A new review suggests that estimates of cyberbullying are all over the place, ranging as low as 5 percent and as high as 74 percent. More>>

7 steps to successful single-parent budgeting

What single mothers and fathers need to know to plan their family's financial freedom.

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Self-driving cars will still need limits for teens

Many Americans want the self-driving cars of the future to also have features that limit the behavior of teen drivers, a new survey finds. More>>

Baby swings, car seats not safe for sleeping

Using car seats, swings, bouncers and other carrying devices as sleeping places for infants puts them at risk for injury or death, a new study warns. More>>

Family stress linked to teen obesity in study

Family stress may put teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese, a new study finds. More>>

Childhood trauma may raise odds of asthma

Children who experience trauma such as divorce, death of a parent or domestic violence are more likely to develop asthma than other kids, new research suggests. More>>

Avoid medication overdoses in children

Medications for children -- even those you can buy over-the-counter -- can be dangerous if a child is given too much, one expert says. More>>

Parental Advisory: How to limit your kids' iPhone usage

Since its inception nearly eight years ago, Apple's iPhone has received rave reviews from adults and children alike. More>>

Parents' attitude may be key to pre-game jitters in kids

Want your child to relax and perform well at that next school swim meet? Try not to raise the bar too high in terms of your own expectations, a new study suggests. More>>

When to keep kids home from school

Trying to determine whether to keep a child home from school due to illness can be difficult for parents, but a pediatrician offers some advice on how to make that call. More>>

14 percent of toddlers may be drinking coffee

Although they may just be learning how to say the word coffee, about one in seven 2-year-olds in Boston drinks the caffeinated beverage, a new study finds. More>>

8 best moments to teach your kids financial responsibility

These tools teach money management -- now and in the future


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Could a dishwasher raise your child's allergy, asthma risk?

Hand washing dishes instead of using a machine to wash dishes may reduce children's risk of developing allergic conditions, such as asthma or eczema, according to a new study. More>>

Teens, young adults most likely to go to ER after car accidents

In a finding that won't surprise many parents, a new government analysis shows that teens and young adults are the most likely to show up in a hospital ER with injuries suffered in a motor vehicle accident. More>>

How to have a baby without having a financial crisis

6 tips to help new parents put their money in order before bringing a child home


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Good sleep habits, enforced rules help kids sleep

A regular bedtime and other sleep-related rules help children and teens get a good night's sleep, a new study suggests. More>>

The 5 best phones you can safely hand over to your kids’ grubby paws

These days, it takes more than simply ringing the steel triangle on your deck to round up the kids for supper.  More>>

Menu calorie counts may mean less fattening meals for kids

Parents might order fewer calories for their children if menus included calorie counts or information on how much walking would be required to burn off the calories in foods, a new study suggests. More>>

Many parents too quick to switch child car seats, study finds

Nearly three-quarters of American parents place their children in forward-facing car seats before it's safe to do so, a new study reveals. More>>

Few parents think 18-year-olds can handle their health care

Many American parents don't think their teen and young adult children are able to manage their own health care, a new survey finds. More>>

Mom, put down that smartphone at dinner

Harried mothers who want to stay close with their kids should put aside their smartphones and tablets at the dinner table, a new study suggests. More>>

Laundry detergent pods pose poisoning risk to kids

Laundry detergent "pods" seriously sickened more than 700 U.S. children and killed at least one in a recent two-year period, a new report reveals. More>>

'Social host' laws may help curb underage drinking

"Social host" laws, which hold adults accountable for any underage drinking that takes place on their property, may help curb teenage drinking, according to the preliminary findings of a new study. More>>

Teens who dine with their families may be slimmer adults

For those teens who try to avoid spending time with their parents and siblings, new research suggests that sitting down for family meals might help them stay slim as adults. More>>

Teen conflicts spill over to other areas of their lives

Teens' conflicts at home increase the risk of problems at school for up to two days, according to a new study. More>>

'Desensitized' parents let kids watch more movie violence, sex

When parents become desensitized to violence and sex in movies, they may also become more lax about their children's exposure to both onscreen, a new study suggests. More>>

Answers to kids' tough money questions

Smart ways to have the money talk. More>>

Do greener neighborhoods produce healthier babies?

Pregnant women who live in leafy, green neighborhoods are less likely to have premature or low birth weight babies, a new study suggests. More>>

The parenting trap: Coddling anxious kids

Some parents may make things worse for their anxious kids by falling into what researchers call the "protection trap" -- reassuring them, lavishing them with attention or making the threat go away, according to the... More>>

Parents' divorce may hit higher-income kids harder

When their parents split up, children in higher-income families -- but not those in lower-earning homes -- are more likely to develop behavior problems, a new study suggests. More>>

Mom's response to baby's cry a matter of memory

A mother's response to her baby's crying may be influenced by her own childhood, a new study reports. More>>

Sibling bullies may leave lasting effects

While a burly kid on the playground may be the stereotype of a childhood bully, a new study suggests some of the most damaging bullies are as close to home as you can get: They're siblings who tease, make fun of and... More>>

Music lessons may help bridge 'achievement gap'

A community music program for disadvantaged children boosted an important part of their brain development and function, according to a new study. More>>

This app will shut down your phone until you call your mom back

Many teenagers can withstand 10 missed calls from mom without batting an eyelash, but when you take away Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and everything else, most won't last five minutes without calling dear old mom and dad to beg for their freedom back. More>>

Fewer unmarried women having children

Fewer unmarried America women are having babies, with the notable exception of those who are over 35, federal health officials reported Wednesday. More>>

Affordable family fun

© Jupiterimages / BananaStock / Thinstock © Jupiterimages / BananaStock / Thinstock

7 inexpensive summertime activities.

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Protect your kids from the heat

Parents need to be aware that hot weather can pose a serious threat to children and must take steps to protect their youngsters, an expert says. More>>

Chronic migraines affect the whole family

When a spouse, partner or parent has chronic migraines, the whole family suffers, a new study found. More>>

Pediatrics group wants parents to read to their children every day

All pediatricians should encourage parents to read out loud to their children every day, beginning in infancy, to promote literacy and strengthen family ties. More>>

Study links pesticide exposure during pregnancy to autism risk in kids

Pregnant women who live within a mile of spaces where commercial pesticides are applied appear to have an increased risk of having a child with autism, a new study suggests. More>>

Tips for keeping that bounce house safe

Inflatable bounce houses may be fun for kids, but only if they're used correctly, experts caution. More>>

ER visits peak when kids barred from child care

Child care centers commonly bar parents from dropping off a child with a runny nose or other minor illness. And the result, a new study finds, can be needless trips to the emergency room. More>>

Father time: Make every day Father's Day

This Father's Day, take a minute to think about the kind of dad you want be. More>>

Does your child's car seat weigh too much for LATCH?

Car seats are heavier than ever--and some parents aren't including that weight when they fit their kids and car seats to LATCH systems. More>>

Are you addicted to being too busy?

These days, having a crammed work, kids and activities schedule has almost become a status symbol. But being super-busy isn’t always a sign of a fulfilling life More>>

Your guide to keeping kids healthy

Your kids may come home from school this winter with something more worrisome than homework -- sniffles, tummy bugs and even (ick!) lice. More>>

Get your kids cooking with you

Is your dinner table a battlefield? You aren't alone. But your child isn't doomed to a diet of white bread and chicken nuggets -- there's hope. Kids are more likely to try foods that they had a hand in cooking.
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Start your own Christmas morning traditions

Here are seven holiday activities to slow down and make the morning more magical and memorable for both you and your children.
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Thanksgiving craft ideas for keeping kids busy

Sure, some tots will play a board game quietly in the corner, but if you’ve got a crew with a bit more energy, read on for Thanksgiving craft ideas to keep them occupied this holiday season.
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Best road trips, coast to coast

Pack up and take your pick of these primo family-friendly routes.
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Family-friendly historical trips

Looking to plan a family vacation that is both entertaining and educational? Go historical.
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Surviving a power outage with kids

Tech-loving kids can make a blackout feel like an eternity -- if you don’t have a plan in place. Turn this surprise into a period of family bonding and fun with the following ideas.
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BeLuvv Guardian is a LoJack-like system for tracking small kids

The Guardian is a small, tracking device to be worn by a child as a bracelet or necklace. When combined with a mobile application, the radio chip communicates with the parent's mobile device and can send an alert when the child has traveled too far away.
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How to raise cultured kids

Do you long for your child to choose the symphony over SpongeBob and couscous over mac ’n’ cheese? Raising a cultured kid can be easier than you think.
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The smart mom's kitchen

Cooking at home is more cost-effective than ordering in, better for your family’s health, and if you do it right, quicker, too. Check out this list of items you should always have in stock for delicious, kid-friendly 30-minute meals.
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5 digital ways to stay close to grandparents

These days, extended families are more likely to be spread out. The good news is, today's grandparents are more tech-savvy than they were even five years ago.
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The biggest car seat mistakes parents make

With the kids back at school and parents' schedules more hectic, mid-September is a good time for a reminder of proper car-seat safety. Sept. 15 to Sept. 21 is also Child Passenger Safety Week. More>>

Is social media making your kids less smart?

Will the amount of time your child spends tweeting and sharing online affect their grades?
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3 ways to relive your favorite summer memories

A new school year may be fast approaching, but that doesn’t mean the fun has to end just yet.
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4 best train trips in America

When you think about it, a family vacation by train is a no-brainer. The price is right, the scenery terrific, and everyone’s in a good mood.

 
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Healthy summer snacks for kids

This summer make your own kid snacks rather than purchasing premade snacks. You'll have a better idea of what your kids are eating and you'll probably save money at the grocery store.
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One in three teens "just not interested" in driving

Less than half of all American teenagers get their first driver's license within a year of becoming eligible to drive, a new study from AAA says.
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