On the Record: July 6, 2011 - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

On the Record: July 6, 2011

Posted: Updated:

 

Quincy Police

Thefts, burglaries

A pair of gray high heel shoes and some papers were taken from a Pontiac while the vehicle was parked in the 1000 block of Kentucky between June 28-29.

A window unit air conditioner was taken from a residence in the 400 block of Cherry between June 23-24.

 

Quincy Fire

Department

Fire damaged a house at 517 Cedar on June 27. Firefighters were on the scene from 1:01 to 3:03 a.m. The rire started on a enclosed porch area. No one occupied the rental property owned by Marty Jackson. There were no injuries to firefighters. Information was not available earlier due to the storm that hit Quincy the same morning.

No one was injured in the 3:24 p.m. June 27 fire in a one-story house at 1318 N. Second. The occupant, Kyle Buss, was not at home at the time. The fire of electrical nature started in the basement.

 

Hannibal (Mo.)

Fire Department

A small fire was found on the first floor of a residence at 211 S. Ninth, Hannibal, at 6:20 p.m. July 4. The fire, believed to have been of electrical nature, was extinguished before it caused major damage to the structure. Firefighters were on the scene for about two hours. There were no injuries.

 

 

  • Local HeadlinesLocal HeadlinesMore>>

  • New technology to battle resistant weeds means new stewardship requirements

    New technology to battle resistant weeds means new stewardship requirements

    Saturday, January 31 2015 12:49 AM EST2015-01-31 05:49:19 GMT
    QUINCY -- Mark Bernards reported a few scattered resistant weeds were in Western Illinois University fields in 2012 and 2013. By 2014, resistant weeds were widespread in a couple of fields, and the same scenario is becoming more common across West-Central Illinois and Northeast Missouri. "You realize what I've been doing in the past no longer works, and to accomplish in the future what I've done in the past is going to be hard," Bernards said.
    QUINCY -- Mark Bernards reported a few scattered resistant weeds were in Western Illinois University fields in 2012 and 2013. By 2014, resistant weeds were widespread in a couple of fields, and the same scenario is becoming more common across West-Central Illinois and Northeast Missouri. "You realize what I've been doing in the past no longer works, and to accomplish in the future what I've done in the past is going to be hard," Bernards said.

  • Labor contracts remain unsettled for Quincy police, firefighter unions

    Labor contracts remain unsettled for Quincy police, firefighter unions

    Thursday, January 29 2015 8:58 AM EST2015-01-29 13:58:54 GMT
    Labor agreements between the city of Quincy and bargaining units representing firefighters and police officers and sergeants have yet to be reached, and it appears at least one could be decided by arbitration. Police officers and firefighters have been operating without a contract since the previous three-year deals expired April 30. 
    Labor agreements between the city of Quincy and bargaining units representing firefighters and police officers and sergeants have yet to be reached, and it appears at least one could be decided by arbitration. Police officers and firefighters have been operating without a contract since the previous three-year deals expired April 30. 
  • Drop in gasoline prices produces windfall for city, schools, counties

    Drop in gasoline prices produces windfall for city, schools, counties

    Saturday, January 31 2015 1:02 AM EST2015-01-31 06:02:28 GMT
    When gas prices soar, city and county agencies are forced to use money that might otherwise go toward expenses such as new equipment or pothole repairs and spend it on fuel. So when gas prices fall, as they have in recent weeks, what happens? The price of a gallon of gasoline recently dropped below $2 in West-Central Illinois and Northeast Missouri, the first time below that level since March 2009. 
    When gas prices soar, city and county agencies are forced to use money that might otherwise go toward expenses such as new equipment or pothole repairs and spend it on fuel. So when gas prices fall, as they have in recent weeks, what happens? The price of a gallon of gasoline recently dropped below $2 in West-Central Illinois and Northeast Missouri, the first time below that level since March 2009. 
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2015 WorldNow and Quincy Herald-Whig. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.