Lifestyles

Duffie-Dietrich

Posted: Oct. 20, 2012 7:02 pm Updated: Dec. 1, 2012 8:15 pm

 

St. Anthony Catholic Church was the setting for the June 16 wedding of Andrea Marie Dietrich and Dustin John Duffie, both of Moscow Mills, Mo.

The bride is a daughter of Douglas and Pamela Dietrich of Quincy. The bridegroom is a son of John and Cathy Duffie of Beardstown and Stacey and Craig Miller of Rushville.

The bride was given in marriage by her parents during the 1 p.m. ceremony conducted by Deacon John Esselman. Music was provided by Christine Poage, vocalist, and Loretta Nobis, pianist. Also participating in the ceremony was Kallie Westerman, reader.

Maid of honor was Jenna Dietrich, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Ashley Allen, Kelly Greenwell, Sara Harman and Sarah Bowles.

Best man was Cody Duffie, brother of the bridegroom. Groomsmen were J.D. Buss, Joseph Henricks, Brian Peacock and Kyle Peacock.

Ushers were Dustin Allen, Caleb Barry and Nicholas Ehrgott.

Flower girl was Hannah Miller and ring bearer was Logan Forrest.

A rehearsal dinner was hosted by Mr. and Mrs. John Duffie at the home of the bride's parents. A dinner reception began at 6 p.m. in the Holiday Inn East.

The newlyweds are at home in Moscow Mills after honeymooning in the Hawaiian islands of Oahu and Maui.

The bride is a 2009 graduate of Western Illinois University with a master of science degree in communication sciences and disorders. She is a speech-language pathologist with the Lincoln County R-3 School District and a speech-language pathologist and E.I. examiner with Missouri First Steps.

The bridegroom is a 2008 graduate of WIU with a bachelor of science degree in law enforcement and justice administration. He is a state trooper with the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

 

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