News

Good News Case 9: Major illness causes family to struggle

Posted: Nov. 28, 2012 11:09 am Updated: Dec. 12, 2012 11:15 am

By SANDI TERFORD
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

Tom and Amy were doing as well as any young family just three years ago. All that changed when Tom was diagnosed with a major illness that eventually required an organ transplant.

Tom and Amy, not their real names, are Case No. 9 in the 24th annual Good News of Christmas campaign, which provides support to dozens of area families this holiday season.

Tom hoped to return to work after his recovery, but doctors deemed that too risky to his health. His wife has since worked to support the family, which includes three small children. Despite not knowing how the bills would be paid, she has managed to make ends meet and hopes to get a better paying job soon.

The family is requesting a bed for their young daughter. Household needs include a table and chairs, bedding for a toddler bed, crib and king size bed, towels and wash cloths, shower curtain and bathroom supplies.

A young son can use clothing, socks, underwear and shoes. He'd like a bike with training wheels and a helmet, a Cars 2 movie and a race track with cars. A toddler son needs a potty chair, diapers, jeans, shoes, shirts, socks and underwear. He'd like Barney DVDs. Tom and Amy's daughter is a Justin Bieber fan and would love posters and CDs of the singer. She'd also like a CD player, bike, Barbies, clothing, shoes and underwear.

For themselves, Tom and Amy are requesting shoes, jeans and T-shirts. The couple also has an outstanding debt which was secured to help pay bills. They have expressed appreciation of any help to provide their children with a good Christmas.

Drop boxes for the Good News of Christmas can be found at the The Quincy Herald-Whig, Kmart, Shopko, Wal-Mart, the Quincy Mall customer service desk near Krieger's, outside of Bergner's, outside of J.C. Penney, Sam's Club and Farm & Home Supply.

More information about how to help the campaign is available by calling Dustin Hall or Nathan Daly at 506-1783.

 

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