Hawks benefit from Hahn's sharpshooting off the bench

Despite starting 11 games last season, Scott Hahn has been used exclusively off the bench this year. Hahnís versatility makes him an asset in the reserve role. (H-W Photo/Melissa Klauda)
Posted: Dec. 4, 2012 3:42 am Updated: Dec. 25, 2012 6:15 am

Herald-Whig Sports Writer

Scott Hahn is one of the most versatile players on the Quincy University men's basketball team. The 6-foot-6 sophomore has played anywhere from shooting guard to center this season.

That versatility is one of the main reasons Hahn hasn't been in the starting lineup in any of QU's five games this season.

"He plays anywhere two through five," said QU coach Marty Bell, whose Hawks (3-2) open Great Lakes Valley Conference play against Illinois-Springfield at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Pepsi Arena.

"He knows that, and he's versatile, and he can pick up the schemes. Sometimes it's good to have that (guy coming off the bench), because you don't know who's going to be in foul trouble first. So if it's anywhere two through five, I can insert him."

Hahn showed his versatility in QU's 81-74 win over Lindenwood on Saturday at Pepsi Arena. QU's 6-10 sophomore center Drake Vermillion picked up his second foul 3 minutes, 15 seconds into the game and played only seven minutes total.

Although Hahn didn't come in to replace Vermillion -- Bell used 6-6 freshman forward Geoffrey Hartlieb as the first sub -- Hahn was inserted in the game at the 14:18 mark. He played anywhere from the off-guard positions to power forward and even some center.

Defensively, Hahn teamed with senior forward Tyler Thompson in the low post throughout much of the game to help the Hawks defend a Lindenwood team with considerably more size.

Offensively, Hahn continued to serve as a marksman. He was 6 of 7 from the field, including 2 of 2 from 3-point range, and scored a team-high 21 points.

Hahn is tied for the team lead in field-goal percentage at 60 percent (15 of 25). His 66.7 percent clip (8 of 12) from 3-point range leads all QU players with at least four 3-point attempts.

"I'll tell you, Scott, he's stepped up," Thompson said. "And he's stepped up before for us. He's kind of that guy if he gets going, we're a heck of a team."

Oftentimes, it's more significant who finishes a game than who starts it. All three of QU's wins have come by seven points or less, and Hahn has been on the court for the closing minutes in two of those three wins.

Hahn's average of 19.2 minutes per game ranks sixth on the team. His 28 minutes Saturday were a season high.

"It doesn't really matter," Hahn said about whether he starts or not. "I'm going to do what's best for our team."

That's the attitude Bell likes to see from his top bench options.

"Starting lineups, I could care less about," Bell said. "And starting lineups cause more problems in your locker room than you wish you ever had. I worry about the guys who are going to play the majority of the minutes. When Scott comes off the bench, if (the opponent counters with a substitute), well that's a pretty good situation for us, because I have a guy who really could be out there to start the game, and he's coming in and being really productive.

"It doesn't bother him not to (start), because he knows he's going to play a lot."

Hahn experienced both the starting and reserve roles last season, when he started 11 of QU's 27 games. He ranked fourth on the team in scoring at seven points per game and shot a team-best 39.5 percent from beyond the arc.

Entering this season, Bell was curious to see who would emerge as a third scoring option to go alongside the team's 1-2 scoring punch of junior guard Chris Babbitt and Thompson.

Twice this season, Hahn has filled the role of that third scoring option. In addition to leading the team in scoring against Lindenwood, Hahn paced QU with 16 points in its 62-60 win over Truman State on Nov. 20.

"Coming off the bench, I just take it and run with it," Hahn said. "If I can come in and be a spark off the bench, to me, that's fine. I like that. If I can come in and score some quick points, that's great."


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