On the Street: Roasting Mentesti, special fans and trusting politicians

Posted: Jan. 12, 2013 4:20 pm Updated: Feb. 9, 2013 7:15 pm


NO TECHNOLOGY, NO PROBLEM: Brad Billings, a former chairman of the Great River Economic Development Foundationn board, roasted retiring GREDF President Jim Mentesti just a little during the agency's annual meeting. "He managed to have a brilliant career for 27 years without ever learning to use a computer. Jim doesn't text or tweet ... he brings people to the table," Billings, one of Mentesti's closest neighbors, said.

SPECIAL FANS: The fifth-grade Lil Devils boys basketball team from Quincy had special fans in attendance while playing in a tournament last weekend in Macomb. During the Lil Devils' first game on Saturday morning, Western Illinois University senior point guard Ceola Clark took in the team's game. Before the team's second game that day, Clark and teammates Terell Parks and Remy Roberts-Burnett spent time with the Lil' Devils. Both the Lil' Devils and the Leathernecks were winners that day. The Lil' Devils wound up winning their tournament, while the Leathernecks won their ninth straight game that night by beating IUPUI. WIU is having one of its best seasons ever and hasn't lost a home game this season.

TRUST ME: During a recent gathering of the Exchange Club, club member Randy Frese was given the task of "twisting tails," when he tells a few jokes and stories after lunch while taking $1 donations from each member. One of the first club members Frese approached didn't have a $1 bill and was holding out a larger bill, hoping that Frese would give him change. Frese said to the club member that he should go ahead and put the larger bill in the kitty, and he offered to come back to the table after picking up money around the room. However, the wary club member decided to hold on to the larger bill. "I'm not a politician any more," Frese said. "You can trust me." Frese lost in his bid to unseat State Sen. John Sullivan in the race for the 47th District in November's election.


On the Street is a compilation of tips and tidbits gathered by The Herald-Whig staff. Readers may contribute by email at