Aric Sharp named VP of network development at Iowa Health System - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Aric Sharp named VP of network development at Iowa Health System

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Aric Sharp (H-W File Photo) Aric Sharp (H-W File Photo)

By STEVE EIGHINGER
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

Aric Sharp, chief executive officer for Quincy Medical Group, has been named vice president of network development at Iowa Health System in Des Moines, Iowa.

Sharp will begin serving in this new capacity this month, but he also retain the title of CEO with the Quincy Medical Group.

"I'll continue as the CEO (in Quincy), but the role will be more limited," Sharp said. "I'll be working with the board more on strategy and development and will also help determine who will lead the day-to-day operations (of QMG)."

Sharp said a decision on the leader of day-to-day operations at QMG will probably be made this summer.

"What is important is to have a good transition, and I have great confidence with the management team in place (in Quincy)," he said.

Sharp, who will turn 40 in April, has been CEO at QMG since April 2007. He will play a key role in advancing the efforts of Iowa Health System as a national leader in care coordination through relationship management and building open communication lines to support physicians and providers in the organized systems of care.

According to information provided by IHS, Sharp will be responsible for facilitating and implementing organized systems of care for Iowa Health System and "will collaborate with physician and administrative leadership to continue the strategic development of physician-led OSC governance with employed and independent providers" in the eight regions served by the system in Iowa and Illinois.

Quincy Medical Group finalized an agreement in 2012 to become part of the Iowa Health System while remaining an independent entity at the local level. QMG's affiliation with the Iowa Health System permits it to create an affiliate relationship and enhance its capabilities to coordinate patient-centered health care, improve efficiencies and better help contain costs.

Sharp will split time in the coming months between Des Moines and Quincy, but he and his family will relocate in Iowa this summer.

"It was a difficult decision to leave Quincy, because we love this community and the kids are happy here," he said. "But this opportunity is unique."

The Iowa Health System has relationships with 26 hospitals in metropolitan and rural communities and more than 195 physician clinics. IHS affiliates provide patient care in Illinois and Iowa and employ more than 22,000 people.

Sharp was named one of Modern Healthcare's 12 "Up and Comers under 40 years old from across the United States."

In the past five years under Sharp's direction, QMG has received National Committee for Quality Assurance Level 3 Certification as a Patient-Centered Medical Home, converted the group's primary care providers to Certified Rural Health Clinic status resulting in enhanced reimbursement and formed the QMG Physician Leadership Institute.

Sharp also spearheaded the formation of a national coalition working to change federal policy to allow Certified Rural Health Clinics to participate in the Physician Quality Reporting System, Meaningful Use, E-Prescribing and Accountable Care Organizations.

He previously served as the chief operating officer of the Iowa Clinic, the largest physician owned multi-specialty group in Central Iowa.

Sharp spent 11 years at the Iowa Clinic and also held positions of senior financial analyst, director of business development and director of operations.

"Aric has spent many years preparing for the relationship building, leadership and innovation that this role demands," Mike Murphy, president and CEO of accountable care at IHS, said in a news release. "He is the ideal candidate to lead the transformation of our physician communications and network architecture. With his direction, we can better support our physicians and ensure that they have no barriers preventing them from working together to provide every patient with the best outcome."

Quincy Medical Group is a physician-owned clinic with a staff of more than 600.

Sharp received his master's degree in hospital and health administration from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, and his bachelor's degree in finance from Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. He also has extensive experience in new program development, acquisitions, implementation of electronic medical records and joint ventures.

Sharp and his wife, Amy, have three children — Cameron, 13, Anna, 9, and Ellie, 2.

— seighinger@whig.com/221-3377

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