Quincy man sentenced to 15 years in prison in meth case - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Quincy man sentenced to 15 years in prison in meth case

Posted: Updated:
Sheldon Broome Sheldon Broome

By DON O'BRIEN
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

A Quincy man was sentenced to 15 years in the Illinois Department of Corrections on Wednesday for his role in a methamphetamine operation discovered during a December bust.

Sheldon L. Broome, 33, pleaded guilty to an amended charge of unlawful meth manufacturing. Broome had a more serious charge of aggravated unlawful meth manufacturing dismissed and another meth case against him from last year dismissed as part of a plea agreement. Instead of waiting for sentencing, Broome agreed to a term of 15 years in the DOC.

"I take full responsibility for what I've done," Broome told Judge Scott Walden during Wednesday's hearing. "I take my sentence. ... I can't blame anyone but myself."

Broome was one of five people arrested Dec. 19 at a residence in the 2000 block of Hampshire after a raid by the West Central Illinois Task Force.

"(Broome) had a more active role than any of the others," Adams County First Assistant State's Attorney Gary Farha said. "This negotiation of 15 years is because it is a serious offense, and he was the most involved."

Broome was staying at the residence as a guest. Farha said Broome and William J. Mullet, 31, would manufacture meth at the residence where children also lived, which is why the original charges against all involved were aggravated.

Sheriff's Deputy Sam Smith said during Broome's preliminary hearing in January that Broome had purchased pseudoephedrine pills Dec. 12. Broome allegedly told Smith that he would trade the pills he purchased for meth or would sell them for between $50 and $100 a box. Broome allegedly told Smith that he was in the house twice when meth was being cooked.

Frank J. Mullet, 51, told officers that he accepted finished meth in exchange for rent payments for others living in the house. Mullet, who is William Mullet's father, pleaded guilty to unlawful use of property last month. He faces between three and seven years in the DOC when he is sentenced by Walden on March 22.

Two others arrested Dec. 19 have also entered guilty pleas. Rita R. Black, 25, entered a guilty plea last month to a lesser charge of methamphetamine manufacturing of less than 15 grams, a Class 1 felony. As part of the plea agreement, Black could be sentenced to no more than seven years in prison. Sentencing in her case is set for March 20 in front of Walden.

Danielle D. Wolkitt, 39, pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of meth precursors. Wolkitt could receive between three and seven years in prison when sentenced April 18 by Walden.

William Mullet has his case set to be heard on the May jury docket.

Broome was given credit for 85 days served in the Adams County Jail. He has been lodged there since his arrest in lieu of a $150,000 bond. Broome was also fined $2,997.

 

-- dobrien@whig.com/221-3370

 

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