News

Early voting starts Monday

Posted: Mar. 22, 2013 7:57 pm Updated: Apr. 12, 2013 9:15 pm

By MATT HOPF
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

Early voting starts Monday in Illinois, but Adams County Clerk Georgia Volm isn't sure what to expect with the few calls her office has received.

Turnout for early voting and requests for absentee ballots usually provides an idea of overall turnout.

"Maybe it's because I just got done with the presidential election where my phone was ringing off the hook, but it seems low at the moment," she said. "That may all change Monday when we open up our doors."

Volm does not predict voter turnout until after a few days of early voting.

Mayoral elections tend to increase turnout. Four years ago, 34.68 percent of voters in Adams County cast ballots. In 2011, with no citywide positions on the ballot, only 22.82 percent of voters turned out.

This differs greatly from the turnout during a presidential election year. In November, nearly 69 percent of voters cast ballots.

Volm said the mayoral election will help boost turnout, but she expects the Quincy School Board and Quincy Park Board races to generate interest, as well.

"I think it's more than just the mayoral race," she said. "We have a couple wards that are contested, so I think it will help with our turnout all the way around."

She said the office is ready for early voting and is preparing for the April 9 election.

Early voting runs through April 6. The clerk's office is open from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. and can be accessed off the Fifth Street entrance of the Adams County Courthouse.

A government-issued photo ID is required for early voting.

-- mhopf@whig.com/221-3391

 

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