WEB EXTRA: Newcomb Hotel history - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

WEB EXTRA: Newcomb Hotel history

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• Friday night was the third major fire at the site. The first two were in 1904 and 1883. The 1883 fire was when the site was known as the Quincy House.

• Abraham Lincoln stayed overnight in the Quincy House on the nights of Oct. 31 and Nov. 1, 1854, when he came to the city to campaign for his friend, Archibald Williams, a candidate for the U.S. Senate.

• Four years after the Quincy House was destroyed by fire in January 1883, the Quincy Hotel Company purchased the land, and I.S. Taylor, an architect from St. Louis was hired to design the building eventually known as the Newcomb Hotel, which opened in March 1889.

• In its early days, some people called the hotel the Park Hotel, but most referred to it as the Newcomb Hotel, after Richard Newcomb, the president of the Quincy Hotel Company. Newcomb also was a founder of the Quincy Paper Company in 1880.

• The 77,500-square-foot, 120-room structure had sat vacant for more than 30 years.

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