Paul Bealor - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Paul Bealor

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People who supported Paul Bealor's nomination for The Herald-Whig's 20 Under 40 section describe him as a selfless worker, who has leadership abilities and a strong work ethic.

"Paul has the rare ability to attend to detail and yet see the big picture of what needs to be done and make a community better," said Phil Conover, who served on the Unit 4 Foundation Board with Bealor.

Heath Voorhis, president of the Sportsman's Club, said Bealor has been a member for five years and became treasurer within the first year. He's been one of the club's most active workers and has helped recruit several new members.

Pam Shaffer, executive director of the American Red Cross of Adams County, noted that Bealor, 31, has donated 17 gallons of blood or platelets since he made his first donation at age 16.

Bealor said he tries to focus on the important things in his life and give back to the community.

"I try to balance it out between faith and giving back to community and family and work. That's the four main parts of my life," Bealor said.

BIO

Age: 31

Family: Rachel, wife of seven years; Henry 2, Ben 4 months

Education: Unity High School; Truman State University with a major in business finance and minor in economics.

Community involvement: Ursa Lions Club, Unity Sportsman Club, Unit 4 Foundation, Unity Athletic Boosters, St. Edward's church member, Red Cross volunteer, Ursa Park Festival co-coordinator and Unity Technology Steering Committee.

Q&A

What is your job, what do you do and what do you like best about it? Employee benefits administrator for First Bankers Trust Services. I provide administrative services for employee retirement plans. What I like best is that we help employees receive their benefits that they have worked their entire careers to accumulate.

What is a typical workweek like? Each day starts with getting the kids ready for daycare. Work is typically very busy, reviewing financial reports, approving benefit distributions and managing plan assets. Evenings entail having dinner with my family, playing baseball with Henry and enjoying Ben's smiles and noises.

What was your first job, and what do you remember about it? My first job was working on a farm for a family friend. I remember he taught me to drive a tractor and the ins and outs of working the land.

How do you balance everything? With patience and a plan. I always keep in mind that my family comes first and that everything I do is to support and provide for them.

Which person has influenced you the most and why? Not one person, but my parents. They taught me the value of hard work, the importance of giving back to your community, and the importance of putting family first.

Have you ever failed at something? How did you recover? Of course, everyone fails at something. I remember my first rejection on a job interview after college. It was the first interview I had for a professional position, I picked myself up and prepared for the next one.

What does success mean to you? Being able to go home and feel like I accomplished something, either in work or in community service.

What was your proudest professional moment? Accepting my recent promotion to loan officer at First Bankers Trust's Mendon branch.

What is your favorite stress buster/leisure time diversion? Playing ball with my son. The look on his face when he hits the ball is priceless.

What is the biggest need in your community? In this time of government cutbacks and people tightening up their donations and spending less on everything across the board, it is important to remember to support your local businesses and organizations. Schools and non-profit organizations are receiving less government aid. People are donating less and not attending community events as heavily as in the past. It is important to remember that the church picnics, ice cream socials, park festivals, fundraisers and all the events at your local high school are what keep our communities thriving. Please take the time to support your local organizations, both financially and with your attendance.

What gives you reason for optimism in your community? In all the organizations I am involved in, I am always pleased with the support we receive. People in our community turn out to support each other. It always makes me so happy that I had the privilege to grow up in such an environment. I feel blessed to live and work in that same community.

If you could go back in time and give advice to yourself when you were in high school, what would it be? Pay attention to the small things, they always end up being the big things.

If you weren't working for First Bankers Trust Services, what would you be doing? Working outdoors.

If you could add a few more hours to the day, how would you spend them? Playing with my kids for a little bit more before they go to bed.

Do you live by any mantra or saying? A friendly smile and common courtesy can go a long way.

Career aspirations aside, name one thing you definitely want to accomplish in your lifetime. Visit the Holy Land

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