News

Salvation Army Christmas campaign looking for final push to reach $390,000 goal

Posted: Dec. 26, 2013 9:01 am Updated: Jan. 9, 2014 11:15 am

By DON O'BRIEN
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

Christmas has come and gone, but Salvation Army Maj. Andy Miller believes holiday magic is still in the air.

With less than a week left in the year, the Salvation Army still needs help to reach its $390,000 goal for its 2013 Red Kettle Christmas campaign. Miller is optimistic that the goal will be reached.

"We believe that the people of this area will help us find a way to get us over our goal for this year," he said.

Christmas Eve was the final day for bell ringers accepting donations in the Salvation Army's red kettles set up outside area businesses. Miller said the campaign surpassed $300,000 Tuesday after the figure stood at $294,359 Monday, but it still needs one final boost to reach the goal. Any contributions to the campaign made before Jan. 31 will count toward the 2013 campaign total.

Miller encourages people who are thinking about making a tax-deductible donation to do so before the end of the month so that it can be counted toward the donor's 2013 taxes.

Miller said the campaign is vital for the Salvation Army's operations throughout the year. The campaign provides Christmas food baskets, toys for children, delivery of gifts to nursing homes and shut-ins, and community holiday meals. Year-around programs such as the emergency shelter, food pantry, rent and utility assistance, disaster services, youth programs, and summer camps also benefit from the campaign.

Donations may be made by cash, check or credit card inside the Salvation Army Kroc Center, 405 Vermont. Donations also can be made online at www.onlineredkettle.org/salvationarmyquincy.

The campaign exceeded its 2012 goal of $375,000, bringing in $376,000. The campaign raised $407,038 in 2011 and $349,000 in 2010.

-- dobrien@whig.com/221-3370

In Case You Missed It

'LIVE UNTIL I DIE': Quincy woman with metastatic cancer focuses on goals
Beth Calabotta doesn't know how much time she has left. The 48-year-old Quincy resident is living with a cancer-induced death sentence. But Calabotta isn't about to roll over and let the cancer get the best of her. "You can't sit around and think, 'Oh, I'm going to die,'" she said.