Full dorms prompt Culver-Stockton to curtail further residential admissions

Slade Myers, summer community assistant, clears one of several office spaces in the lower level of Johnson Residence Hall, Culver-Stockton College, Canton, which are being renovated and transformed into dorm rooms. (H-W Photo/Steve Bohnstedt)
Posted: Jul. 15, 2014 8:41 am Updated: Aug. 5, 2014 12:15 pm

Herald-Whig Staff Writer

CANTON, Mo. -- Culver-Stockton College is shutting down residential admissions for the 2014-15 school year effective Wednesday -- two weeks earlier than scheduled -- because the college's residence halls have been filled to capacity.

The college is expecting its largest incoming class of new students in nearly 15 years, with more than 350 new arrivals anticipated. The college's retention rate for freshmen moving to their sophomore year at Culver-Stockton also hit a 10-year-high of 94 percent this year.

As a result, the college's total enrollment is expected to come in at around 1,000 students this fall, with more than 95 percent of those students wanting to live on campus, according to C-SC officials.

The college has been in the process of renovating several buildings to create additional dorm rooms to accommodate the surge of new students.

"We have filled all of the housing, including what was built this summer," Jessica Cate, director of communications, said.

Consequently, the college is no longer accepting admissions from prospective students who want to live on campus. However, Cate said the college will continue to accept admissions until Aug. 1 from regional commuting students.

"As enrollment numbers nationally are down, we are very excited to go against that trend," Misty McBee, director of admission, said in a press release. "The campus is buzzing with excitement as the additional housing is being built to accommodate the larger class, and we await all of the new students to arrive on campus in August."


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