Detective's interest in Lovelace case led to grand jury indictm - Quincy Herald-Whig | Illinois & Missouri News, Sports

Detective's interest in Lovelace case led to grand jury indictment

Posted: Updated:
  • Detective's interest in Lovelace case led to grand jury indictmentMore>>

  • Lovelace was facing small claims suit with finance company

    Lovelace was facing small claims suit with finance company

    Monday, December 1 2014 10:05 AM EST2014-12-01 15:05:21 GMT
    Quincy lawyer Curtis Lovelace, who was indicted Wednesday by a grand jury on first-degree murder charges in the 2006 death of his wife, was set to go to trial in a small claims court case next month. Information obtained...
    Quincy lawyer Curtis Lovelace, who was indicted Wednesday by a grand jury on first-degree murder charges in the 2006 death of his wife, was set to go to trial in a small claims court case next month. Information obtained...
  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • UPDATE: Palmyra grain bin fire reignites

    UPDATE: Palmyra grain bin fire reignites

    Thursday, December 18 2014 10:06 AM EST2014-12-18 15:06:51 GMT
    Crews from two Marion County fire departments battled a grain bin fire at a complex east of Palmyra for 10 hours Wednesday. The Palmyra Fire Department and Hannibal Rural Fire Department responded to the bin, located off Missouri 168, around 8:30 a.m.
    After crews from two Marion County fire departments battled a grain bin fire at a complex east of Palmyra for 10 hours Wednesday, the fire rekindled at about 6:30 a.m. Thursday. Rick Jones, Palmyra's assistant fire chief, said the Palmyra Fire Department had extinguished Thursday morning's fire by about 8:15. He expected that crews would be on the scene for another hour.

  • 12 vie for Beaux Arts queen title

    12 vie for Beaux Arts queen title

    Wednesday, December 17 2014 2:28 PM EST2014-12-17 19:28:52 GMT
    The Quincy Art Center celebrates the 84th Beaux Arts Ball, a Quincy tradition, from 7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 21. The Oakley-Lindsay Center will once again host the ball, and music will be provided by Mobile Entertainer. The reigning queen, Anna McNay, daughter of Richard and Patricia McNay, will crown the new queen during the coronation ceremony beginning at 8 p.m.
    The Quincy Art Center celebrates the 84th Beaux Arts Ball, a Quincy tradition, from 7 to 11 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 21. The Oakley-Lindsay Center will once again host the ball, and music will be provided by Mobile Entertainer. The reigning queen, Anna McNay, daughter of Richard and Patricia McNay, will crown the new queen during the coronation ceremony beginning at 8 p.m.
  • Quincy man sentenced to three years in prison for sex abuse charge

    Quincy man sentenced to three years in prison for sex abuse charge

    Thursday, December 18 2014 9:28 AM EST2014-12-18 14:28:59 GMT
    A Quincy man who pleaded guilty to one count of aggravated criminal sexual abuse Oct. 20 was sentenced to three years in the Illinois Department of Corrections. Ted A. McGlaughlin Jr., 23, was arrested April 8 after the parents of a teenage girl reported that she was having a sexual relationship with a man older than 21.
    A Quincy man who pleaded guilty to one count of aggravated criminal sexual abuse Oct. 20 was sentenced to three years in the Illinois Department of Corrections. Ted A. McGlaughlin Jr., 23, was arrested April 8 after the parents of a teenage girl reported that she was having a sexual relationship with a man older than 21.

By DON O'BRIEN
Herald-Whig Staff Writer

Only one thing about Cory Lovelace's death in 2006 concerned Quincy Police Chief Rob Copley.

"At that time, I don't recall anything that really caused me great alarm," Copley said. "Was it concerning that they couldn't make a determination on cause of death? Yes, because that leaves the case open."

That open case led a member of the Quincy Police Department's detective unit to take another look at the case late last year.

Copley would not name the detective who took a closer look at the case, but that person's work ultimately led to a grand jury indicting Lovelace's husband, Curtis, on first-degree murder charges on Wednesday.

The bill of indictment alleges that Curtis Lovelace suffocated Cory Lovelace, which caused her death.

Adam Gibson, a Quincy detective, is listed as the only witness on the bill of indictment.

Curtis Lovelace, 45, is being held on $5 million bond in the case. He made his first appearance in Adams County Circuit Court on Thursday.

Copley said new information led to the grand jury indictment.

"There was one detective who was the driving force on that and got some information and learned some things," he said. "That is what started it."

Cory Lovelace, 38, was found dead inside the couple's home at 1869 Kentucky on Valentine's Day morning in 2006. A month after she died, a coroner's jury ruled the cause of death undetermined. An autopsy reached the same conclusion.

Copley said autopsy results were reviewed by other pathologists, who he said determined Cory Lovelace's death was a homicide. She was cremated.

Copley said Cory Lovelace's death was investigated at the time by the department.

"We really ran into a situation where we had no more leads to follow and no more direction to go," Copley said.

Copley said he had not heard from Cory Lovelace's family over the years.

"I had not had any contact, and to my knowledge, there hadn't been any push from the family, and I had not heard from them," he said. "Unlike some cases in the past, I was never contacted or recall hearing about any real push back from the family after the investigation came to an end at that time."

Because of what he knew about the new facts in the case, Copley wasn't surprised the grand jury returned an indictment against Curtis Lovelace. He also was not surprised by seeing someone like Lovelace, a lawyer who formerly served as an assistant state's attorney and was a longtime member of the Quincy School Board, involved in a case like this.

"It's a unique circumstance, especially in our area," Copley said. "I'm never surprised by what anyone is accused of doing over the years. I can't say that it's a terrible shock, because you don't know what other people have done or will do."

Copley said his department is still investigating the case, even though the grand jury has indicted Lovelace.

"We are finishing up some interviews," Copley said. "There's probably not a lot more work to be done, but one interview could lead you to a lot more work. It's still considered an active investigation."

Lovelace once worked in the Adams County State's Attorney's Office and was on staff at the time of Cory Lovelace's death, so the office has had to remove itself from the case. Ed Parkinson, the former state's attorney in Morgan County, was assigned to handle the case. Parkinson said he has handled more than 150 murder trials during his career.

He doesn't believe the age of the case will hurt in its prosecution.

"It always has an effect on a trial because this is a few years later, but this was an open case," Parkinson said Thursday. "It's fully investigated now, and the investigation is still ongoing. I don't anticipate anything too ‘un-ordinary' about (the prosecution)."

Parkinson said he hadn't seen a case like this before.

-- dobrien@whig.com/221-3370

  • Local HeadlinesLocal HeadlinesMore>>

  • Schock: Bill passed by Congress empowers those with disabilities

    Schock: Bill passed by Congress empowers those with disabilities

    Thursday, December 18 2014 6:28 PM EST2014-12-18 23:28:30 GMT
    U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock said a “no brainer” bill that will give people with disabilities new freedom to set aside savings has won passage in Congress. “Unfortunately right now our society penalizes folks who are living with a disability from creating a nest egg and providing for themselves and doing what all of us think is the responsible thing of saving for a rainy day,” Schock said.
    U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock said a “no brainer” bill that will give people with disabilities new freedom to set aside savings has won passage in Congress. “Unfortunately right now our society penalizes folks who are living with a disability from creating a nest egg and providing for themselves and doing what all of us think is the responsible thing of saving for a rainy day,” Schock said.
  • Welding sparks set off fire at LaGrange auto body shop

    Welding sparks set off fire at LaGrange auto body shop

    Thursday, December 18 2014 8:53 PM EST2014-12-19 01:53:40 GMT
    Welding sparks triggered a Thursday afternoon fire that damaged a truck and building at Stub's Auto Body on Route B in LaGrange, Mo.
    Welding sparks triggered a Thursday afternoon fire that damaged a truck and building at Stub's Auto Body on Route B in LaGrange, Mo.
  • Culver-Stockton professor surprised to see renewal of U.S.-Cuba relations

    Culver-Stockton professor surprised to see renewal of U.S.-Cuba relations

    Thursday, December 18 2014 6:13 PM EST2014-12-18 23:13:01 GMT
    David Carrothers had more than a casual interest in Wednesday's announcement concerning the United States and Cuba agreeing to re-establish diplomatic relations and dialing back some of the economic and travel restrictions between the two countries. Carrothers, a Culver-Stockton College professor and a former member of the U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command, was visiting Cuba year ago at this time.
    | 217-221-3377seighinger@whig.com | @StevieDirtWHIG
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and Quincy Herald-Whig. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.