Herald-Whig

Carlous Wires Jr. found in contempt of court during Gavin retrial

Carlous Wires Jr. was sentenced to 30 days in the Adams County Jail after Judge Robert Adrian found him in contempt of court Wednesday.
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By Herald-Whig
Posted: Jan. 22, 2020 4:40 pm Updated: Jan. 22, 2020 4:41 pm

QUINCY — Carlous Wires Jr. was sentenced to 30 days in the Adams County Jail after Judge Robert Adrian found him in contempt of court Wednesday.

Attending the closing arguments in the Steven E. Gavin retrial in the 2015 shooting death of his father, Carlous Wires Sr., Wires Jr. walked up to the front of the court and placed what appeared to be a $20 on the divider in front of the gallery.

A court security officer immediately told him to stop, and he was removed from the courtroom.

Adrian consulted with attorneys outside the courtroom, asking what direction they would like to take, including what to tell the jury.

"It makes it more of an issue than it already is," said Lead Trial Attorney Josh Jones, who suggested they not tell the jury anything else regarding the issue.

Defense attorney Curtis Lovelace said he spoke to his client about making a motion for a mistrial, but that Gavin said he didn't want to do that. Lovelace said he only caught a portion of the incident out of the corner of his eye while he was setting up for his closing argument.

All agreed to not address the issue any further with the jury.

Wires Jr. apologized when he was brought into the courtroom after closing arguments.

"He killed my dad for 20 bucks, and I gave him what my dad owed him," he said.

Gavin reportedly shot Wires Sr. over a disagreement on a drug purchase where he wanted $100 for crack cocaine, and Wires Sr. only wanted to pay $80.

Wires Jr. will receive day-for-day credit for time served, but he will not be eligible for work release.

It's not the first time Adrian has found someone in contempt of court during a murder trial.

In October 2015, he sentenced a woman to 30 days in the Adams County Jail after she disrupted testimony during a trial.